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(via Post-Katrina New Orleans A Story Of Modern Pioneering)
It’s 8 years today that Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast. In New Orleans, once-displaced Lower Ninth Ward resident Ronald Lewis has collected, in a shed behind his rebuilt home, cultural artifacts — like Mardi Gras photos and regalia — in an effort to keep his culture alive. There’s also a Hurricane Katrina display.

"This collection shows the resilience of the people. We had lost everything, but we didn’t lose hope. So every piece in here is symbolic of that — of people wanting to share in the story of us rising out of the ruins of Katrina and saying, ‘We’re here, we’re back,’ " Lewis says.

His collection is open to the public. It’s called The House of Dance and Feathers.
Photo: Debbie Elliott/NPR

npr:

(via Post-Katrina New Orleans A Story Of Modern Pioneering)

It’s 8 years today that Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast. In New Orleans, once-displaced Lower Ninth Ward resident Ronald Lewis has collected, in a shed behind his rebuilt home, cultural artifacts — like Mardi Gras photos and regalia — in an effort to keep his culture alive. There’s also a Hurricane Katrina display.

"This collection shows the resilience of the people. We had lost everything, but we didn’t lose hope. So every piece in here is symbolic of that — of people wanting to share in the story of us rising out of the ruins of Katrina and saying, ‘We’re here, we’re back,’ " Lewis says.

His collection is open to the public. It’s called The House of Dance and Feathers.

Photo: Debbie Elliott/NPR

nprfreshair:

Chris Hayes tells Terry Gross about how the last decade affected his politics:

My disposition as a human being is kind of a go-along-to-get-along person. I tend to trust authority. I tend to think people in charge broadly know what they’re doing, don’t lie to you, aren’t going start wars for no reason and, you know watching Iraq happen and then watching the financial crisis happen and then Katrina in the middle of that, you know, you turn around and, you think, ‘Wait a second: No one is on top of anything. Who the heck is in charge here? These people who say that they know what they’re doing don’t know what they’re doing. I’m not going to trust them the next time they tell me they know what they’re doing.’ It’s a radically unmooring feeling to recognize that people that you just figured kind of had it under control don’t have it under control and might be totally incompetent or completely corrupt or totally self-dealing.

Image of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina by greenmanowar

nprfreshair:

Chris Hayes tells Terry Gross about how the last decade affected his politics:

My disposition as a human being is kind of a go-along-to-get-along person. I tend to trust authority. I tend to think people in charge broadly know what they’re doing, don’t lie to you, aren’t going start wars for no reason and, you know watching Iraq happen and then watching the financial crisis happen and then Katrina in the middle of that, you know, you turn around and, you think, ‘Wait a second: No one is on top of anything. Who the heck is in charge here? These people who say that they know what they’re doing don’t know what they’re doing. I’m not going to trust them the next time they tell me they know what they’re doing.’ It’s a radically unmooring feeling to recognize that people that you just figured kind of had it under control don’t have it under control and might be totally incompetent or completely corrupt or totally self-dealing.

Image of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina by greenmanowar

mediamattersforamerica:

Disgusting: Now NRA News is praising the white vigilante patrols that shot black New Orleans flood victims following Hurricane Katrina. 

What really happened:

Facing an influx of refugees, the residents of Algiers Point could have pulled together food, water and medical supplies for the flood victims. Instead, a group of white residents, convinced that crime would arrive with the human exodus, sought to seal off the area, blocking the roads in and out of the neighborhood by dragging lumber and downed trees into the streets. They stockpiled handguns, assault rifles, shotguns and at least one Uzi and began patrolling the streets in pickup trucks and SUVs. The newly formed militia, a loose band of about fifteen to thirty residents, most of them men, all of them white, was looking for thieves, outlaws or, as one member put it, anyone who simply “didn’t belong.”

According to The Nation, during this time ”at least eleven people were shot. In each case the targets were African-American men, while the shooters, it appears, were all white.”

Donnell Herrington was one of these victims:

It was September 1, 2005, some three days after Hurricane Katrina crashed into New Orleans, and somebody had just blasted Herrington, who is African-American, with a shotgun. “I just hit the ground. I didn’t even know what happened,” recalls Herrington, a burly 32-year-old with a soft drawl … Herrington says he hadn’t even seen the men or their weapons before the shooting began. As Alexander and Collins fled, Herrington ran in the opposite direction, his hand pressed to the bleeding wound on his throat. Behind him, he says, the gunmen yelled, “Get him! Get that nigger!”

The attack occurred in Algiers Point. The Point, as locals call it, is a neighborhood within a neighborhood, a small cluster of ornate, immaculately maintained 150-year-old houses within the larger Algiers district. A nationally recognized historic area, Algiers Point is largely white, while the rest of Algiers is predominantly black. It’s a “white enclave” whose residents have “a kind of siege mentality,” says Tulane University historian Lance Hill, noting that some white New Orleanians “think of themselves as an oppressed minority.” 

spoookyscary:

New Orleans, US. Hurricane Katrina, parish Saint Bernard, September 2005 (Donatien Garnier). Collectif Argos.

spoookyscary:

New Orleans, US. Hurricane Katrina, parish Saint Bernard, September 2005 (Donatien Garnier). Collectif Argos.

Hurricane Katrina was one of the deadliest storms in U.S. history, and by far the costliest. Katrina killed more than 1,800 people, displaced 1.5 million more, leveled tens of thousands of homes, and left nearly 80 percent of New Orleans under water.

ObamaCare has, to date, killed zero people and destroyed zero homes, while leaving New Orleans dry. It has, however, caused a political brouhaha by intentionally pushing people toward better insurance plans and having a glitchy website.

- ObamaCare is Hurricane Katrina: Today’s horrible, flawed, lazy political metaphor (via theweekmagazine)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 29, 2005:  Hurricane Katrina Hits New Orleans
Eight years ago today, Hurricane Katrina made landfall in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Category 4 storm claimed almost 2,000 lives and caused $80 billion in damage.
Watch NOVA's “Storm that Drowned a City” to see what led to the devastating floods that Katrina unleashed on New Orleans.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 29, 2005:  Hurricane Katrina Hits New Orleans

Eight years ago today, Hurricane Katrina made landfall in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Category 4 storm claimed almost 2,000 lives and caused $80 billion in damage.

Watch NOVA's “Storm that Drowned a City” to see what led to the devastating floods that Katrina unleashed on New Orleans.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 29, 2005:  Hurricane Katrina Hits New Orleans
Eight years ago today, Hurricane Katrina made landfall in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Category 4 storm claimed almost 2,000 lives and caused $80 billion in damage.
Watch NOVA's “Storm that Drowned a City” to see what led to the devastating floods that Katrina unleashed on New Orleans.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 29, 2005:  Hurricane Katrina Hits New Orleans

Eight years ago today, Hurricane Katrina made landfall in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Category 4 storm claimed almost 2,000 lives and caused $80 billion in damage.

Watch NOVA's “Storm that Drowned a City” to see what led to the devastating floods that Katrina unleashed on New Orleans.

nolainspired:

Today as I said earlier is the eight year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. To honor the date and to honor what has survived I have collected some delicious looking recipes that celebrate New Orleans cuisine. ▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴▿▴

▴ 1  ▴ 2  ▴ 3  ▴ 4  ▴ 5  ▴ 6  ▴ 7  ▴ 8  ▴ 9 

 

I am sorry that your government hates you. We saw what happened in Katrina. I’m sorry that your government hates you.

- Melissa Harris-Perry recounts how, on a 2009 visit to Africa, a South African, who had lived under Apartheid, expressed pity for her, a black American from a recently Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans [ x ] (via odinsblog)